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Troubleshooting Windows XP Setup
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Troubleshooting Windows XP Setup

The following table lists solutions for problems you may encounter during Windows XP Setup.

Problem

Solution

Setup can't find the CD–Rom Drive.
  • Verify that your hardware is listed on the Hardware Compatiblity List (HCL).
  • Use the startup disk that came with your CD–ROM to reload the drivers for the CD–ROM. Updated drivers are     also available from the manufacturer.
  • Try another method of installing, such as a network installation
  • If you are performing a new installation and you start the installation from Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT, click Advanced Options during Setup, and then copy files to your hard disk.
  • Setup can't read the CD–Rom Drive.
  • Verify that the CD–ROM or DVD drive is working
  • Clean the CD.
  • Use a different CD. To request a replacement CD, contact Microsoft or your computer manufacturer.
  • You see a blue screen (also called a stop error).
  • Follow the instructions that appear on the screen
  • Windows XP Professional won't install or won't start.
  • Verify that your hardware is listed on the Hardware Compatibility List (HCL).
  • Simplify the hardware configuration as much as possible by temporarily removing hardware not required by Setup (modems, sound cards, and network cards).
  • Make sure that you have the latest drivers, firmware and BIOS for the computer and all hardware.
  • There is insufficient disk space.
  • Free up space on an existing partition by deleting files that you no longer need and emptying your Recycle Bin, or, if you have more than one drive or partition, by moving files to another partition.
  • Remove existing partitions and create a new partition large enough for installation (+1.5GB).
  • Format an existing partition to remove all existing files and create more space.
  • You are unable to connect to your network. Check the following list and make sure that:

     
  • CAPS LOCK isn’t on while you’re typing your password. Windows XP Professional passwords are case–sensitive.
  • Your password is current. If you have recently received the message, “User must change password at next logon,” your password may have expired.
  • The domain name you used is correct.
  • You are using a recognized user name.
  • Your network cable is properly attached to the computer and the network connection.
  • The network settings on your computer have not been changed.
  • If this list does not identify your problem, run a networking troubleshooter (click Start and then click Help and Support; click Fixing a problem, in the left-hand column, and then click Networking problems), or contact your network administrator.
  • You are unable to join a domain.
  • Make sure your computer is physically connected to a network.
  • Make sure the domain name you used is correct.
  • Check with your network administrator to make sure a computer account exists for you.
  • Verify with your network administrator that the DNS server and domain controller are running and online.

    If none of these steps help solve your problem, join a workgroup instead, and then join the domain after installation.
  • Note:  If you computer has only the minimum required memory, the setup process may take longer.

     

    CAUTION
    Removing or reformatting a partition will delete all of the data that exists on that partition.

    Troubleshooting with Advanced Startup

    If your computer doesn’t start correctly, you can use advanced Startup options to run Windows XP Professional to troubleshoot your problem.

    To start your computer by using an advanced Startup option

    1. Click Start, click Shut down, click What do you want the computer to do? and then click Restart. Click OK.
       
    2. When the list of available operating systems appears, press the F8 key.
       
    3. On the “Advanced Options” screen, select the advanced Startup option you want, and then press ENTER.

    Before using Advanced Startup, go to Help and Support Center and type “Safe Mode Options” in the Search box.

    Troubleshooting Stop Errors

    A stop error occurs when Windows XP Professional stops responding. Stop error messages can be caused by hardware or software malfunctions. The error messages appear on a blue or black background.

    General Stop Errors

    The following steps, which also appear on the stop error screen, help you determine the cause of a stop error and how to correct the problem.

    To troubleshoot General Stop Errors

    1. Restart your computer.
       
    2. Make sure any new hardware or software is properly installed. Unplug each new hardware device, one at a time, to see if this resolves the error. If it does, go to step 3.

      Replace any hardware that proves faulty by this test. Also, try running any hardware diagnostic software supplied by your computer manufacturer.

      If this is a new installation of hardware or software, contact the manufacturer for any Windows XP Professional updates or drivers you might need.
       
    3. Click Start and then click Help and Support. Click Get support, or find information in Windows XP newsgroups (under “Ask for assistance”) and then click Get help from Microsoft in the left-hand column.
       
    4. Click Start, click Help and Support, and then click Fixing a problem (under “Pick a Help topic”) for a list of Troubleshooters.
       
    5. Check the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) to verify that all your hardware and drivers are compatible with Windows XP Professional.

      To see the most recent version of the HCL, visit the Microsoft Web site.
       
    6. Disable or remove any newly installed hardware (RAM, adapters, hard disks, modems, and so on), drivers, or software.

         
      • If you can start Windows XP Professional, check the System Log in Event Viewer for additional error messages that might help identify the device or driver causing the problem. To view the System Log, click Start and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, and then click Administrative Tools. Double–click Event Viewer to open it and then System Log to view.
         
      • If you can’t start Windows XP Professional, try to start your computer in safe mode, and then remove or disable any newly added programs or drivers. To start your computer in safe mode, restart your computer; then, when you see the list of available operating systems, press F8. On the “Advanced Options” screen, select Safe Mode, and then press ENTER.

        For more information, go to Help and Support Center and type “Safe Mode Options” in the Search box.
    7. If you have access to the Internet, visit the Microsoft Support site.

      Search the Microsoft Knowledge Base for “Windows XP Professional” and the number associated with the stop error you received. For example, if the message “Stop: 0x0000000A” appears, search for “0x0000000A.”
       
    8. Using a current version of your antivirus software, check for viruses on your computer. If you find a virus, perform the steps required to eliminate it from your computer. See your antivirus software instructions for these steps.
       
    9. Verify that your hardware device drivers and your system BIOS are the latest available versions. Your hardware manufacturers can help you determine the latest versions or help you obtain them.
       
    10. Disable BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing. If you need assistance, contact your hardware manufacturer.
       
    11. Run any system diagnostic software supplied by your computer manufacturer, especially the memory check.
       
    12. Verify that your computer has the latest Service Pack installed. For a list of service packs and instructions for downloading them, go to the Windows Update Web site.
       
    13. If you are unable to log on, restart your computer. When the list of available operating systems appears, press F8. On the Advanced Options screen, select Last Known Good Configuration, and then press ENTER.
      IMPORTANT
    When you use Last Known Good Configuration, system setting changes made after the last successful startup are lost.

    Specific Stop Errors

    Some stop errors display descriptive messages such as “DATA_BUS_ERROR” that can help you determine the exact solution for the error. This section discusses how to troubleshoot specific stop errors, based on the type of error you receive.

      IMPORTANT
    The information in this section should be used only by the most advanced users.

     

     Software and device driver errors

    Error Number Descriptive Text
    0x0000001E KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
    0X000000D1 DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    0x000000EA THREAD_STUCK_IN_DEVICE_DRIVER
    0x00000050 PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
    0X0000000A IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    0x0000007B INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE
    0x0000009F DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
    0XC000021A STATUS_SYSTEM_PROCESS_TERMINATED
    0XC0000221 STATUS_IMAGE_CHECKSUM_MISMATCH

    Note:  Stop errors 0x0000001E, 0x0000000A, and 0x0000007B can also be caused by general hardware errors. If the steps provided here do not resolve these errors, see the steps under Hardware failure errors. Follow the procedure under general Stop errors. If the stop error persists, try the following steps.

    To troubleshoot software and device driver stop errors

    1. Check that the driver identified in the stop message is signed and certified by Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL). Run Sigverif.exe to check for unsigned drivers.
       
    2. Try to replace the driver identified in the stop message, either with a good copy from your installation media, or with an updated version from the manufacturer.
       
    3. Disable the driver identified in the stop message or any newly installed drivers.
       
    4. If you have a video driver not supplied with Windows XP Professional, try switching to the standard VGA driver or to a compatible driver supplied with Windows XP.
       
    5. Uninstall any software that uses filter drivers (for example, antivirus, disk defragmentation, remote control, firewall, or backup programs).
       
    6. Run Recovery Console, and allow the system to repair any errors that it detects. 

       
    7. If the error occurred immediately after RAM was added to the computer, the paging file might be corrupted or the new RAM might be either faulty or incompatible. In this case, delete the Pagefile.sys file, and return the system to the original RAM configuration.
     File system errors
    Error Number Descriptive Text
    0x00000023 FAT_FILE_SYSTEM
    0x00000024 NTFS_FILE_SYSTEM

    Follow the procedure under General Stop errors. If the stop error persists, try the following steps.

    To troubleshoot file system stop errors

    1. If you’re using a small computer system interface (SCSI) adapter, obtain the latest Windows XP Professional driver from the hardware vendor, disable the sync negotiation for the SCSI device, verify that the SCSI chain is correctly terminated, and check the SCSI IDs of the devices. If you’re unsure how to do any of these steps, refer to the instructions for the device.
       
    2. If you’re using integrated device electronics (IDE) devices, define the on-board IDE port as Primary only. Check the Master/Slave/Only settings for the IDE devices. Remove all IDE devices except the hard disk. If you’re unsure how to do any of these steps, refer to the instructions for your hardware.
       
    3. Disable or uninstall any software that uses filter drivers (for example, antivirus, disk defragmentation, remote control, firewall, or backup programs).
       
    4. Run Chkdsk /f to determine if the file system is corrupt. If Windows XP Professional can’t run Chkdsk, move the drive to another computer running Windows XP Professional, and run the Chkdsk command on the drive from that computer.
     Hardware Failure errors
    Error Number Descriptive Text
    0x0000001E KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
    0x0000000A IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    0x0000007B INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE
    0x0000007F UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP
    0xC0000218 UNKNOWN_HARD_ERROR

    Note:  Stop errors 0x0000001E, 0x0000000A, and 0x0000007B can also be caused by software and device driver errors.

    Follow the procedure under General Stop Errors, earlier in this book. If the stop error persists, try the following steps.

    To troubleshoot hardware failure stop errors

    1. Check that the devices on your computer have drivers that are signed and certified by Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL). Run Sigverif.exe to check for unsigned drivers.
       
    2. Check the manufacturer for driver updates that may be available for your hardware.
       
    3. Update any software that uses filter drivers (for example, antivirus, disk defragmentation, remote control, firewall, or backup programs).
       
    4. Uninstall any non–critical hardware and software to help isolate the item that may be causing the problem.
       
    5. Install Windows XP in a new folder. Add drivers and restart as you proceed, to isolate the driver that is causing the problem.
       
    6. Run Recovery Console, and allow the system to repair any errors that it detects.

      Still Getting Errors?

    Under rare circumstances, you may need to uninstall Windows XP Professional and return to your original operating system.

    To uninstall Windows XP
     

    • Click Start, click Control Panel, click Add or Remove Programs.
    • Click Windows XP Professional, click Remove and then follow the instructions on your screen.

     

    HOW TO TROUBLESHOOT A COMPUTER PROBLEM


    Depending on the type of Computer Problem that you are experiencing, there can be many different types of solutions.  Typically the problem is something very basic.  Here is a list of items that you can check before asking for help.  This may solve the problem.  If this doesn't fix your problem, please use the helpdesk software to start a case.

    1)    Reboot the Computer 

    By turning off the computer and turning it back on, you are allowing the memory to start fresh without any errors in it.  This also insures that programs load into memory in a correct order.  99% OF THE TIME, THIS WILL FIX THE PROBLEM!

    2)    Check all cables and make sure that everything is attached to the back of the computer

     Sometimes moving a computer 2 inches can unplug a necessary cable such as your mouse or keyboard.  With most of the newer computers, each port is labeled and each device can only fit into one specific spot.  THE MAIN THING TO REMEMBER IS NOT TO FORCE ANY CABLE WHERE IT WILL NOT GO!  THIS MAY BEND OR BREAK A PIN INSIDE THE CABLE!

    3)    Read through any errors that come up on the screen

     Usually the computer is telling you something about what is going on with the problem.  It may be as simple as "it cannot connect to a device on your computer" or that "a floppy disk is holding up the booting process".  Errors are written by programmers to pop up when something that was expected to happen, did not.  AGAIN, USUALLY A REBOOT WITH FIX THIS PROBLEM!

    4)    If a new problem shows up, it might be connected to something you have just changed or another program that is running in the background

     Most software problems are incompatibilities between other software programs already running in memory.  Quite frequently a software program will believe that it is the only piece of software running on your computer.  The problem is that we are all multitasking people in this day and age.  To help troubleshoot, try running programs one at a time.  If you install a new piece of software into your computer, it may cause problems with the software that has been there for years.  The fewer programs that you have loaded onto your computer will result in less of a chance that the programs will conflict on your computer.  MAYBE UNINSTALLING THAT UNNECESSARY, NEW, CUTE PROGRAM THAT IS NOT TASK RELATED, MIGHT HELP OUT YOUR COMPUTER!

    5)    Backup your data

     When you notice a problem is starting to take form, backup what is important on the computer.  Try to avoid a second copy on the computer itself because  if the hard drive goes out, you will have still lost your data.  You can backup to network drives, zip disks, or floppy.  Floppies can be easily broken and wear out quickly.  DO NOT RELY ON FLOPPY DISKS AS YOU'RE ONLY BACKUP.  DEFINITELY DO NOT WORK SOLELY ON FLOPPY DISKS OR PREPARE TO PAY THE PRICE OF LOSING YOUR DATA!

      

    If these quick fixes do not fix your computers problem, please use the help desk software or if it is unavailable, contact the appropriate staff to start a trouble ticket with our system.  Thanks

     

    - Questions or Comments -
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